Get in touch with G&L Scientific today!

Warren, NJ   |   Boston, MA   |   San Diego, CA   |   Los Angeles, CA  |  Boca Raton, FL
E: hello@gandlscientific.com
London   |   Belfast   |   Marlow
E: hello@gandlscientific.com

Is early introduction key to reducing allergies?

August 1, 2022

A new study suggests an early introduction to foods associated with allergies could reduce reactions to them.

A new study suggests an early introduction to foods associated with allergies could reduce reactions to them.

Research by the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden has shown that infants who were given a taste of peanut, milk, wheat, and egg from the age of three months had a lower risk of developing a food allergy at the age of three years than controls.

Food allergies that can cause anywhere from mild to acute, life-threatening allergic reactions affect 2–5 per cent of all children.

Some studies have indicated that early introduction of allergenic foods, such as peanuts and eggs, can reduce the risk of food allergies in susceptible children.

However, evidence that it could be effective in children has, to date, been lacking.

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet, the University of Oslo, Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm (Sweden), Oslo University Hospital and Östfold Hospital Trust (Norway), have now examined if the risk of food allergy at the age of three years can be mitigated if children are given regular small portions of food containing peanut, milk and egg from the age of three months.

The results show that children who received early tastes had a 1.1 per cent risk of developing an allergic reaction to one of the introduced foods by the age of three, compared to a 2.6 per cent risk among children who did not have early food introduction.

The main contributing factor was the reduced risk of peanut allergy, the most common allergy in the study, which was 0.7 per cent in the intervention group compared to 2.0 per cent in the control group.

The study included 2,397 children from Norway and Sweden, who were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups.

One group received food introduction in the form of regular small portions of peanut butter, milk, wheat or cooked egg from the age of three months; a second group received the same plus moisturizing skin emollients; a third was given only the skin emollients; and a fourth received no specific treatment.

All parents were urged to follow the national food introduction guidelines.

The study identified no safety problems, and no serious allergic reactions caused by the early introduction were observed, supporting the hypothesis that the early and regular introduction of allergenic foods, rather than later introduction or avoidance, can reduce the risk of food allergies.

Related: ‘Five a day’ link to children’s mental health

Back to news
Keep up to date with the latest industry news and trends
Newsletter Signup
Validation

Worldwide Locations

|
G&L Scientific G&L Scientific G&L Scientific G&L Scientific G&L Scientific